Five Ways A Cold Call Is Not A Sales Call

Cold calling makes my students very nervous, and I understand this. Even though I’ve been doing it longer than most reading this have been alive, cold calling makes …

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Cold calling makes my students very nervous, and I understand this.

Even though I’ve been doing it longer than most reading this have been alive, cold calling makes me nervous.

So I find other reasons to reach out and talk with people. It always broadens my network, and often times leads to new business for my company or me.

If nothing else, it helps people remember who I am and what I do.

1 – When it’s a referral- we can give a referral and we can ask for one

When we find excellent people to work in and around our business, the right thing to do is help them, by promoting them to others in our circle.

I struggled to find the right web developer and when I found the right person, I sent that information straight to my network.

Why you ask didn’t I keep that information quiet? Well I wanted this individual to succeed, her success would only help me, and I knew of so many people who needed her work, it would only help me to spread her information around.

2 – When it’s an honest business question

So much of the business world is a dark hallway that leads to nowhere.

You can Google a quick answer, or pick up the phone and call someone who has done it before you.

It feels almost like a quick mentor type relationship, where critical information is exchanged.

I work with lots of startups and incubator programs. These groups need experienced entrepreneur information; I give as much as I take on these calls.

I also do major networking “ who else do you know that could help me with this information?”

3 – When it’s a follow up call

This isn’t a follow up to a sales call, this is a follow up to one of these five non-cold calls.

You send some information or a referral on over, and a week later you pick up the phone to see how it worked out.

These alone have sent my own personal business booming. It models the behavior I’m coaching and reminds people of what I do best.

4 – When it’s networking

I’m not exaggerating when I say, that “Who else do you know that I could call.” Is the greatest statement in business.

Upon meeting people, I usually have two or three people that I know that they should speak with.

Networking is key to not only growth in a company, but also personal growth. There is a bit of Karma that comes with this when it

There is a bit of Karma that comes with this when it is done correctly, where you give and suddenly receive because of all of the giving.

Try it, and I guarantee it will change your life and business.

5 – When it’s pointing to information you have sent in another form

Today’s very busy CEO’s and high-level officers are very tough to get on the phone.

I’ll be very transparent here, when I’m working, I rarely pick up my own phone, or read my messages sometimes.

So a phone message left for me can point to critical information I may be missing. I love Point Drive on LinkedIn for this reason. I’ll send someone a loaded Point Drive presentation and then call them, knowing I will most likely go to Voice Mail.

Then I will leave a quick VM, detailing why they need to watch that point dive.

It works every time.

Conclusion

Communication is key to any kind of success.

The phone is often seen as either the savior or the enemy, but the truth is it’s just another tool to be used correctly. Don’t be afraid of the phone, but instead use it creatively and consistently to find it’s real power.

Don’t be afraid of the phone, but instead use it creatively and consistently to find it’s real power.

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